The FLAG ART FOUNDATION

Non-profit exhibition space
for contemporary art in New York .
Free and open to the public.
four to six exhibitions a year
featuring established and emerging international artists.
Visit our website for more information.

Thank you to everyone who came out  to draw with Will Cotton. It was a lot of fun!

cjwho:

GIFs of the Intricate Process Behind a Multilayered Painting by Julie Mehretu

Julie Mehretu, our current 100 Artists featured artist, is seen here in her Berlin studio working on the painting Middle Grey (2007–2009), one work in a suite of seven paintings commissioned by the Deutsche Guggenheim as part of the exhibition Julie Mehretu: Grey Area.

Come check out Julie Mehretu’s “Fever Graph (algorithm for serendipity), 2013 currently on view at FLAG.

Fridays…

Fridays…

Swoon installing on Houston St

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The Hole
"Misaki Kawai: Hair Show"

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"Anders Oinonen: Eyebrow Haircut"

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Sperone Westwater
"Alexis Rockman: Rubicon"

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Salon 94 Bowery and Freemans
"Lucien Smith: Nature is my Church"

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Awol Erizku's photos of the installation of Wayne Lawrence's exhibition at FLAG he curated.

OPENING THIS SATURDAY OCTOBER 12TH, 6-8 pm.

Amir Zaki,  Tree Portrait #18, 2012
 FLAG is excited to have a photograph by Amir Zaki on view in our summer exhibition, ”Somethingabout a Tree.” Tree Portrait #18  beautifully depicts a Moreton Bay Fig Tree beautifully captured with a unique perspective.

"Zaki photographs individual trees that seem to be abused by the natural elements or mankind. He often selects the trees based on their irregular and eccentric forms. Each photograph becomes an intimate portrait, revealing unexpected beauty."


" Through time, both the natural and manmade elements evolve together and become subtly blended."

http://www.acmelosangeles.com/exhibitions/2013-3-amir-zaki/?view=pressrelease

 
Image: Amir Zaki , Tree Portrait #18, 2012. Ultrachrome archival pigment photograph. 16 x 20 inches. Courtesy the artist and ACME Gallery.

Photograph by Genevieve Hanson.Find out more here: http://www.flagartfoundation.org/exhibition/109/description

Amir Zaki,  Tree Portrait #18, 2012

 FLAG is excited to have a photograph by Amir Zaki on view in our summer exhibition, ”Somethingabout a Tree.” Tree Portrait #18  beautifully depicts a Moreton Bay Fig Tree beautifully captured with a unique perspective.

"Zaki photographs individual trees that seem to be abused by the natural elements or mankind. He often selects the trees based on their irregular and eccentric forms. Each photograph becomes an intimate portrait, revealing unexpected beauty."

" Through time, both the natural and manmade elements evolve together and become subtly blended."

http://www.acmelosangeles.com/exhibitions/2013-3-amir-zaki/?view=pressrelease

 

Image: Amir Zaki , Tree Portrait #18, 2012. Ultrachrome archival pigment photograph. 16 x 20 inches. Courtesy the artist and ACME Gallery.

Photograph by Genevieve Hanson.

Find out more here: http://www.flagartfoundation.org/exhibition/109/description

"Jonathan Owen’s Untitled 2013 is made of a partially erased book page and can be read as a kind of elegant vandalism. By reducing his subjects he delicately examines the essential qualities of an object or image, transforming their entire meaning and presenting the viewer with the curiously unexpected.
Owen’s “drawings” begin as photographs found in books. He gently removes parts of  the original picture which creates a new narrative within the image, whilst leaving a ghostly trace of what was there before.” 
http://www.inglebygallery.com/artists/jonathan-owen/
Owen’s Untitled, 2013 is on view at FLAG as part of our 10th floor summer exhibition “personal, political, mysterious” through September 7. Find out more here: http://www.flagartfoundation.org/exhibition/107/description

"Jonathan Owen’s Untitled 2013 is made of a partially erased book page and can be read as a kind of elegant vandalism. By reducing his subjects he delicately examines the essential qualities of an object or image, transforming their entire meaning and presenting the viewer with the curiously unexpected.

Owen’s “drawings” begin as photographs found in books. He gently removes parts of  the original picture which creates a new narrative within the image, whilst leaving a ghostly trace of what was there before.”

http://www.inglebygallery.com/artists/jonathan-owen/

Owen’s Untitled, 2013 is on view at FLAG as part of our 10th floor summer exhibition “personal, political, mysterious” through September 7. Find out more here: http://www.flagartfoundation.org/exhibition/107/description

“This is all a rather discursive way of saying two things about Harkness.  First, that there is a narrative logic in her work that compares to literature or movies more than to the static medium of easel painting, at least at the pace that form has demanded of viewers for the last few centuries.  In Harkness, local incident unfolds over time as the eye is obliged to read accumulative detail.  And secondly, “bad girl” transgressive as they remain, these sado-masochistic scenarios warrant big audience attention rather than art world connoisseurship. The ingenuity of Hilary Harkness has (or ought to have) blockbuster appeal.”David Cohen of Artcritical.com offers his insightful thoughts through a nine year review on Hilary Harkness.  First seeing her work in 2004 at Mary Boone Gallery, Cohen returns in 2005, 2008 and finally in 2013 at FLAG.  In his most recent review, Cohen contemplates how a Hollywood blockbuster version of Hilary’s painting would span out, including Angeline Jolie as a possible casting decision.  Read the complete article here.This retrospective is a rare opportunity to see this entire body of work together.  Hilary Harkness’ exhibition closes this Saturday, May 18th. Photography by Genevieve Hanson.  Excerpt from “Relentless Yet Dispassionate: Hilary Harkness at the Flag Art Foundation” by David Cohen, artcritical.com

“This is all a rather discursive way of saying two things about Harkness.  First, that there is a narrative logic in her work that compares to literature or movies more than to the static medium of easel painting, at least at the pace that form has demanded of viewers for the last few centuries.  In Harkness, local incident unfolds over time as the eye is obliged to read accumulative detail.  And secondly, “bad girl” transgressive as they remain, these sado-masochistic scenarios warrant big audience attention rather than art world connoisseurship. The ingenuity of Hilary Harkness has (or ought to have) blockbuster appeal.”

David Cohen of Artcritical.com offers his insightful thoughts through a nine year review on Hilary Harkness.  First seeing her work in 2004 at Mary Boone Gallery, Cohen returns in 2005, 2008 and finally in 2013 at FLAG.  In his most recent review, Cohen contemplates how a Hollywood blockbuster version of Hilary’s painting would span out, including Angeline Jolie as a possible casting decision.  Read the complete article here.

This retrospective is a rare opportunity to see this entire body of work together.  Hilary Harkness’ exhibition closes this Saturday, May 18th. 

Photography by Genevieve Hanson.  Excerpt from “Relentless Yet Dispassionate: Hilary Harkness at the Flag Art Foundation” by David Cohen, artcritical.com

Swiss-born artist, Ugo Rondinone’s new instillation Human Nature opened yesterday at the Rockefeller Center with Public Art Fund. The installation of nine 16 to 20 foot-tall, human-shaped stone sculptures is free to the public and on view until June 7th. Read more about it here.

Ugo Rondinone currently has an installation, Love Invents Us, on our 9th floor terrace.

All images from Public Art Fund. 

Richard Prince Untitled (Five Years Ago My Wife), 1998
"We all need to make fun of or be made fun of sometimes.  Richard Prince uses Borscht Belt jokes that continue to deliver head-shaking laughs after all of these years, even in serious art contexts.  When in one of his works Prince includes a joke that starts ‘five years ago my wife ordered me to quit smoking and boozing,’ and in answering whether or not it worked, states that, ‘I don’t know.  I haven’t seen her in five years,’ we smile and perhaps shake our head at the inherent truth in such humor.  The exhibition is intended to get us all to laugh—at ourselves and our lives—and to celebrate the absurdity of it all. Because things that can be be disconcerting can also equally be amusing when cast in the correct light."

Excerpt from Ha. Ha. by Heidi Zuckerman Jacobson from the Funny. exhibition catalog.

Photograph by Genevieve Hanson.

Richard Prince Untitled (Five Years Ago My Wife), 1998

"We all need to make fun of or be made fun of sometimes.  Richard Prince uses Borscht Belt jokes that continue to deliver head-shaking laughs after all of these years, even in serious art contexts.  When in one of his works Prince includes a joke that starts ‘five years ago my wife ordered me to quit smoking and boozing,’ and in answering whether or not it worked, states that, ‘I don’t know.  I haven’t seen her in five years,’ we smile and perhaps shake our head at the inherent truth in such humor.  The exhibition is intended to get us all to laugh—at ourselves and our lives—and to celebrate the absurdity of it all. Because things that can be be disconcerting can also equally be amusing when cast in the correct light."

Excerpt from Ha. Ha. by Heidi Zuckerman Jacobson from the Funny. exhibition catalog.

Photograph by Genevieve Hanson.

Jayson Musson Please Tell Me More About Your Job, 2012
"I greatly value the place of humor in art. When asked about what I look for in the artists and art I choose to exhibit, I often cite humor as a criterion.  I am not looking for the roll-on-the-floor, laughing-my-head-off type of humor I seek from my friends or from entertainment, but rather an acknowledgment of the often-absurd nature of life.  Art that seems to know our everyday lives are tough; art that understands we seek solace as well as inspiration, insight, and yes, even amusement."

Excerpt from Ha. Ha. by Heidi Zuckerman Jacobson from the Funny. exhibition catalog.

Photograph by Genevieve Hanson.

Jayson Musson Please Tell Me More About Your Job, 2012

"I greatly value the place of humor in art. When asked about what I look for in the artists and art I choose to exhibit, I often cite humor as a criterion.  I am not looking for the roll-on-the-floor, laughing-my-head-off type of humor I seek from my friends or from entertainment, but rather an acknowledgment of the often-absurd nature of life.  Art that seems to know our everyday lives are tough; art that understands we seek solace as well as inspiration, insight, and yes, even amusement."

Excerpt from Ha. Ha. by Heidi Zuckerman Jacobson from the Funny. exhibition catalog.

Photograph by Genevieve Hanson.